bee keeping

The Buzz…

My boy Jampot and I have finally brought home some bees and put them in our bee hive that we have been putting together. It’s a cool Aussie invention called a Flow Hive, where instead of getting the frames out of the hive, melting the caps off, putting it in an expensive honey centrifuge, cleaning the resulting gunk of dead bees and wax so that its edible and finally cleaning up all the mess, you just turn a tap and the honey comes out. Check it out here.

It’s good to be using our bee suits for something other than dancing around taking photos for whatsapp. You get bees in a Nucleus hive, the pink box on the right picture, which is put together by queen breeders who put a young queen together with a happy court of workers and drones. Jampot and I brought our nucleus hive home, opened the little door and let them out to explore their new home. Then, after they had been exploring for twenty four hours, we transferred them. I rubbed some grated lemon grass root into the brood box to make it smell like home and we put the frames in. James was very brave and put two frames full of bees into the new hive. With a few hiccups, the hive was populated and running smoothly within a couple of hours. The bees have this unique smell that’s aromatic and slightly astringent and their deep chorus of thrumming wings surrounds you as you introduce them to the hive.

They call the honey bee colony a super organism, a single coordinated community of insects with one identity. The bees make different sounds when they are indifferent moods. When their queen dies they mourn, and they make a particular sound when this happens. truly fascinating. A great thing to do with Jampot. He is keen to start a business which he is going to call the Keeper’s Hat. I am keen to make mead, which is the oldest alcoholic drink in the world, so we’re going to split the harvest.

Apparently bee keeping is growing in popularity. Lots of people are setting up hives. I can understand why, these fascinating little creatures are great!